Fedora 24 and CentOS/RHEL 7 repositories

Fedora 24 repositories have been available for quite some time now, but here is the official statement that everything should be supported out of the box.

As part of the repository availability, I would like to say that starting from Fedora 24, the repositories are self-sustained and do not require RPMFusion to be enabled. I try to preserve compatibility between the two, so if you step into any problem just open an issue to the specific package on Github, send me an email or drop a message in the comment section of the various pages. Please note that “compatible” means that actually you shouldn’t get any conflict when installing packages, and not that I will not overwrite/obsolete the packages provided in the other repositories.

CentOS/RHEL 7 repositories have been available stand alone since the beginning and do not require external repositories to be enabled. Again, if an RPMFusion (or whatever will be mainstream at the moment) CentOS/RHEL 7 repository will appear, I will try to be compatible with it.

Scope of support

My basic idea is to have what I’m using normally everyday as a package in Fedora, enabling software combinations that would be otherwise impossible to distribute in official repositories due to license/patent issues. This for example includes NVENC (Nvidia Encoder) FFMPeg enabled builds that I use almost everyday.

Being a daily CentOS/RHEL 7 user I also want to support the latest and gretest of the same software on that platform, which also means rebuilding some official CentOS/RHEL 7 packages like VP8/9, VDPAU and VA-API libraries.

Due to the various package builds being different (or simply containing newer software releases) from what the other repositories offer, I also try to be completely independent, you can basically install the operating system and just use my repositories.

Build system changes

The (internal at the moment) build system uses Github as its primary system for storing the package information. There is a Negativo17.org public organization where all the work goes, so if you want to look at the development or the SPEC files, just browse to Github. If you have an issue or proposed change as well, you’re welcome to open an issue or create a merge request in the specific package Git page.

Skype Web Pidgin plugin

skype

The Skype repository used to contain purple-skype for Fedora and CentOS/RHEL distributions which at the time required an installed Skype to work. Now, I helped a new Fedora contributor into integrating the newly developed Skype web plugin, which is based on the Skype web client. The package in Fedora obsoletes and provides correctly the skype4pidgin plugin and as such I don’t need to provide anything else in the repository.

The installation instructions have been updated to reflect this.

Skype is available only in 32 bit format, so on a 64 bit a 32 bit client will always be installed. Since the merging with MSN, the HTML welcome screen requires a 32 bit WebKit GTK build to start. This is not included in the 64 bit only CentOS/RHEL 7 repositories; so for this reason, if you are running CentOS/RHEL 7, it requires the multimedia repository to be enabled and have the dependency solved. This used to be self-contained in the Skype repository, but this is no longer feasible for me to mantain considering there is a different rebuild of WebKit GTK in the Multimedia repository.

Spotify Client

spotify-client

The Spotify repository used to contain FFMpeg for CentOS/RHEL distributions and a requirement on FFMpeg’s RPMFusion as a Fedora dependency. FFMpeg is no longer included in the CentOS/RHEL 7 repositories so the multimedia repository has to be enabled to have the dependency solved. As for Skype, this no longer feasible for me to mantain considering there is a different rebuild of WebKit GTK in the Multimedia repository.

Here as well the installation instructions have been updated to reflect the change.

aKMOD kernel module packages

The kernel binary module packages generated by aKMOD are now compressed with XZ, like in the original Fedora kernel packages that contain kernel modules. I’ve become a DKMS contributor, so, as time permits, I will add the same functionality to DKMS for Fedora distributions.

At the moment, this applies to Nvidia and X-Pad kernel modules.

Gstreamer plugins and multimedia libraries

The Multimedia repository now provides GStreamer (1.0) plugins for Bad, Ugly, libAV and VA-API plugin bundles with all options enabled. This is split into the following GStreamer runtime packages:

  • gstreamer1-plugins-bad
  • gstreamer1-plugins-ugly
  • gstreamer1-vaapi
  • gstreamer1-libav
  • gstreamer1-plugins-bad-fluidsynth (pulls in the whole FluidSynth distribution)
  • gstreamer1-plugins-bad-nvenc (x86_64 only, pulls in the Nvidia binary driver; and at the moment it does not work properly)

They all have an Epoch of “1”, due to the various reasons explained at the top. They are not yet available for CentOS/RHEL 7 due to time constraints; I will try to prepare them in the next weeks.

Fedora 24 OpenH264 repository

A note on the Fedora 24 OpenH264 repository. As described in its wiki page, there is an extra repository that can be enabled directly in Fedora 24 that allows you to install OpenH264, its relevant Gstreamer 1.0 plugin and a Mozilla plugin for Firefox. Following the same logic, at the moment the same Gstreamer 1.0 plugin is provided/obsoleted (in newer form) by the gstreamer1-pluings-bad package. There is a conflict for the OpenH264 binaries which I will address soon.

Input devices in Steam Big Picture mode

I’ve just updated the the Steam package to fix input detection of some device in Big Picture mode. The package comes now with some additional configuration files for input devices, to have them properly recognized and functioning in Big Picture mode. Check below for the complete list of input device configurations that have been added:

Configuration for the following devices is part of the original Steam tarball:

  • Steam Controller with USB adapter
  • HTC Vive HID Sensor with USB adapter

Detection for the following device has been modified to make it appear as a Game Pad and not as a mouse (due to its touchpad). This prevents the “ghost” keypresses in Steam Big Picture mode:

  • Nvidia Shield Controller with USB cable

Detection for the following device has been modified to have them properly detected as mice/keyboards and not joysticks due to a bug in the Linux kernel. This prevents the “ghost” keypresses in Steam Big Picture mode:

  • Microsoft Microsoft Wireless Optical Desktop® 2.10
  • Microsoft Wireless Desktop – Comfort Edition
  • Microsoft Microsoft® Digital Media Pro Keyboard
  • Microsoft Corp. Digital Media Pro Keyboard
  • Microsoft Microsoft® Digital Media Keyboard
  • Microsoft Corp. Digital Media Keyboard 1.0A
  • Microsoft Microsoft® Digital Media Keyboard 3000
  • Microsoft Microsoft® 2.4GHz Transceiver v6.0
  • Microsoft Microsoft® 2.4GHz Transceiver v8.0
  • Microsoft Corp. Nano Transceiver v1.0 for Bluetooth
  • Microsoft Wireless Mobile Mouse 1000
  • Microsoft Wireless Desktop 3000
  • Microsoft® SideWinder(TM) 2.4GHz Transceiver
  • Microsoft Corp. Wired Keyboard 600
  • Microsoft Corp. Sidewinder X4 keyboard
  • Microsoft® 2.4GHz Transceiver v9.0
  • Microsoft® Nano Transceiver v2.1
  • Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard (5KV-00001)
  • Microsoft® Nano Transceiver v1.0
  • Microsoft Wireless Keyboard 800
  • Microsoft® Nano Transceiver v2.0
  • WACOM CTE-640-U V4.0-3
  • Wacom Co., Ltd Graphire 4 6×8
  • Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch CTH-460
  • A4 Tech Co., G7 750 mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd Bloody TL80 Terminator Laser Gaming Mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd Bloody RT7 Terminator Wireless
  • Modecom MC-5006 Keyboard
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd Terminator TL9 Laser Gaming Mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd Bloody V5
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd Bloody R3 mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd X-718BK Oscar Optical Gaming Mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Ltd XL-750BK Laser Mouse
  • A4 Tech Co., Sharkoon Fireglider Optical
  • Cooler Master Storm Mizar Mouse

The relevant repository page has been updated accordingly. If you have any additional misbehaving device that does not currently work properly in Steam Big Picture mode, just contact me and I will try to add the device defnitions to the upstream repositories.

Updated packages and new Samsung repository

As some of you may have noticed, a lot of updates and new stuff has been pushed.

Highlights from the updates

  • The Nvidia driver version 358.16 has been promoted as “Short Lived” for Fedora, and it has support for X.org Video ABI 20. So it is now the default for Fedora 21, 22 and 23.
  • Driver version 352.63 is the new “Long Lived” driver for RedHat/CentOS.
  • Both drivers have a fallback mechanism for the SELinux regression introduced in 358.09, so you don’t need anymore to disable SELinux for GDM refresh problems.
  • The legacy driver has been updated to 340.96, and this as well has been enabled for Fedora 23 as it also supports X.org 1.18
  • CDRtools after years of an alpha 3.01 has finally updated to… an alpha 3.02 😀
  • HandBrake has been updated to the very latest snapshot and is relying only on separate source tarballs that are not statically linked. Unfortunately some are of dubious licenses as usual. Please note that there are some issues with subtitle tracks embedded in Matroska files not being correctly interpreted.
  • The Nvidia NVML library and CUDA packages have seen some small update.
  • Steam has been updated to version 1.0.0.51 and has updated UDev rules for the Steam Controller. If you are one of the owners of such controller, you will find support out of the box. The same changes have also been pushed to the RPMFusion package.

New repository

There’s a new repository for Samsung printers, multifunction printers and scanners that carries the “Samsung Unified Linux Driver” for both the scanning and printing functions. Just by installing it and enabling the ports in the firewall should be enough to get every device running in no time. Refer to the appropriate page for details.

Fully fledged FFMpeg binaries

Also, due to popular request, there is now a custom built FFMpeg package that drops in as a replacement for RPMFusion ones and that enables linking and support for all the codecs/encoders/decoders that would result in an unredistributable binary. This is now available the HandBrake repository. The following codecs/encoders/decoders/transports have been enabled:

  • VP8 and VP9 de/encoding
  • WebP encoding
  • AAC (Fraunhofer, LibVO and other variants) de/encoding
  • OpenAL 1.1 capture support
  • BluRay reading
  • AMR-WB de/encoding
  • AMR-NB de/encoding
  • RTMP[E] support
  • H.264 encoding (OpenH264, Cisco variant)
  • OpenGL rendering
  • SSH transport
  • Fontconfig/fribidi text support

This sobstitutes the ffmpeg binary that was provided as part of the CUDA enabled programs, as it is now tied to all the other multimedia libraries available in this repository. The support for Nvidia H.264/H.265 hardware encoding/decoding is enabled here as well and the required packages are now installed through the use of RPM weak dependencies.

The package has a different Epoch so it is not overwritten by normal updates. The idea is to have all the possible codecs supported out of the box, so also expect HEVC kvazaar (H.265), Intel Quick Sync Video (H.265) hardware support through libmfx/mfx_dispatch, CIFS transport, and other stuff, as soon as I have more time.

The same repository will be used to host the CUDA and FFMpeg enabled Blender, as it makes no sense to have a separate repository for it. Either you have a full blown multimedia collection with each component strictly tied to each other, or you just have the plain Fedora repositories with no license/patent encumbered options.

Enjoy!

Fedora 23 packages now live

All the repositories have been updated for Fedora 23, so if you trigger an update, everything should update properly. CUDA enabled programs are still building.

A few notes:

  • HandBrake has been updated to a pre-release of 1.0 for Fedora 23. Updated x264/x265/FFmpeg libraries should give a speed bost to all encoding operations.
  • The Spotify 0.9.x repository has been removed. It will never receive updates anymore, and now the 1.x builds are on feature parity, including 32 bit support. If you haven’t upgraded, just do it now.
  • Nvidia drivers version 358.09 do not yet support X.org driver ABI 20, so you’re probably going to have some lock ups or random issues.
  • The SteamOS and X-Box replacement driver have been updated to the latest upstream.

Please let me know if you have any upgrade issue.

NVIDIA repository improvements

I’ve just pushed a big update to the Nvidia repository. The list of changes is quite big, so if you are a user of the repository please take your time to read through it.

CUDA

CUDA has been replaced with version 7 for all supported RHEL/CentOS/Fedora releases, with the main difference being no more support for 32 bit systems. From now on, there will be no compatibility packages for the i686 architecture. So, after upgrading, make sure to remove all the i686 pacakges (that is, yum/dnf remove cuda\*.i686).

Apart from this, CUDA 7 packages introduce new stuff, improves on the packaging and can now run correctly on all Fedora systems, including Fedora 22, which was not supported by CUDA 6.5. As announced previously, the only “regression” is when enabling C+11 on GCC 5.1 (i.e. Fedora 22).

The new packages take into consideration the Nvidia provided ones, and replace them accordingly; so if you have their packages installed it should upgrade them where appropriate leaving no traces of the former. Local changes include the pkg-config files for development packages (not included in their self installer and in my 6.5 packages) and the segregation of static libraries in their own subpackage, thus reducing installed size greatly. The next step is to proceed like for the open components of the Nvidia driver: replacing all the pre-built binaries with source compiled stuff. At the moment, this includes cuda-gdb, for which sources do exist.

NVIDIA driver

The Nvidia driver has seen a repackaging of the main components, where the biggest change is the library layout.

All the unique libraries are now in standard locations, leaving only the duplicate ones under /usr/lib{,64}/nvidia. Also, X configuration files that the user should avoid touching, have been moved under /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d. Library dependencies have been reduced, so you can now compile a program against the NVML library (libnvidia-ml.so.1) or CUDA without needing to install the full driver or using the Nvidia provided stubs.

This makes for a simpler package with a simpler filter for conflicting libraries and is also propedeutic work to enable hardware accelerated encoding with Steam In-Home streaming and Nvidia drivers. Hardware decoding in Steam has been put in place, so now it’s time for the (only) supported hardware encoding.

NVIDIA beta driver (355.xx)

The biggest change comes with the 355.06 driver in Fedora 23, which introduces partial support for the GL Vendor-Neutral Dispatch library (libglvnd), a new kernel module building system (in preparation for their modeset driver after the 355.x series) and dropped support for Nvidia instanciated modules.

The new beta driver requires the GL Vendor Neutral Dispatch library in place for proper operation, and being this a separate open source project (only a prototype in Mesa, at the moment) it has been built from source. So there is now a required libglvnd package that only contains the libraries required by the driver for running. The more they are integrated with the driver, the more I will enable in the package. This is a transitional package only, as sooner or later Mesa and the X server will introduce the same mechanism, making the transitional package obsolete and just using distribution provided packages.

This with could eventually lead to system running different OpenGL implementations at the same time, solving the Optimus and multiple cards from multiple vendors combination issues.

The Nvidia control panel can be optionally linked to NVML, so I’ve tried to enable it in the beta drivers. I don’t see any changes so far, but probably this is due to the fact that I don’t have new enough cards to be compatible with NVML.

The beta driver has been pushed to the Fedora 23 branch only, as explained in the Nvidia repository page.

As always, feedback is welcome.

Steam made easy

The Steam repository has received some love; changes to the Steam package will also be pushed in RPMFusion after a bit of feedback.

Updated X-Box gamepad driver

The SteamOS X-Box Gamepad driver has been updated with the new Valve rebase on the 3.18 kernel, with new hardware support and bugfixes. Remember to disable Secure Boot if you plan to use it on an UEFI system.

In-Home Streaming

There are now instructions for setting up In-Home streaming, including the firewall rules required for enabling your desktop to accept connections from other Steam clients that are available on your network.

Also, hardware decoding is available if you are streaming from another Steam client and you are not running the Ubuntu Runtime.

Disabling Ubuntu Runtime

It is now possible again to have the steam-noruntime package that pulls in all (known) 32 bit dependencies and allows you to run Steam without the Ubuntu Runtime. Remember this is not supported, so while getting the benefits of it, you might as well encounter additional problems.

Also, some games pull in additional dependencies (the Witcher 2 or Anodyne, for example), so without the Runtime you are on your own to figure out what is missing.

But running Steam without the Ubuntu Runtime has also its benefits, for example you use DTS 7.1 sound through PulseAudio.

The steam-noruntime package also pulls in as the dependencies the required libraries for the hardware accelerated decoding with In-Home Streaming. This makes streaming much less flickery client side.

Those features normally work only with the Ubuntu/Debian libraries on the system, so avoiding the runtime is the only choice.

170 games and counting!

Steam for CentOS / RHEL 7

The Steam repository now contains the Steam client package plus the S3 texture compression library for Open Source drivers for CentOS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

The CentOS/RHEL repository contains also all the SteamOS session files and binaries for running a Steam-only system, like the Fedora ones. As the Fedora packages, the main client is 32 bit only, so when running on 64 bit systems, make sure to load also your 32 bit libraries if you are running on proprietary drivers or the S3 texture compression library if you are running on a 64 bit system. Work on Valve’s X-Box kernel module for CentOS/RHEL is ongoing; as in its current form there are unresolved symbols.

As part of the update, also the Fedora X-Box kernel module has additional fixes on top of Valve’s code.

I will also add the packages to RPMFusion when a CentOS/RHEL 7 branch will eventually be available.

For full details see the repository page.

centos-steam2

centos-steam3

Another batch of big updates for the repositories (Nvidia, HandBrake, Steam, etc…)

Another batch of changes for the repositories. The HandBrake repository has seen some updates:

  • MakeMKV has been updated to version 1.8.11.
  • HandBrake has been updated to the current development version for Fedora 21. It contains additional/different bundled libraries, but the situation is not that bad.
  • libdvdnav is now based on a 5.0.0 snapshot that contains all the fixes required to avoid the HandBrake crash while opening a DVD for scanning with the default settings. Removal of the flag “Use dvdnav (instead of libdvdread)” in the preferences panel is no longer required.

Please test it, I found it much more stable than the previous version. If it works, I might build it also for current Fedora releases.

handbrake-svn

Regarding the other updates:

  • The Nvidia driver is now at version 340.24 for all CentOS/RHEL and Fedora variants.
  • Nvidia Fedora 21 packages have now aKMOD support
  • Nvidia CentOS/RHEL 7 packages have now binary kABI modules, so you can install the binaries directly without relying on DKMS.
  • The CDRtools suite has been updated to version 3.01a24.
  • The Steam package has been updated to version 1.0.0.48-2, the same build has been pushed to RPMFusion. The repository hosted here still contains other SteamOS packages.
  • The Flash plugin package has been updated to version 11.2.202.378 and Skype has been updated to version 4.3.0.37. Both versions have also been pushed to RPMFusion in the form of lpf packages.
  • Spotify it’s still at version 0.9.10; as the x86_64 and i386 builds share the same data package. Upstream has updated the x86_64 build to 0.9.11 but at the same time has reverted the i386 build to 0.9.4, so all Ubuntu users will not get the update anymore. Until this is sorted out, I’m going to leave the current package versions as 0.9.10 for systems that are both 32 and 64 bit. RHEL/CentOS 7 (which is 64 bit only) has the new 0.9.11 version.

As always, any issue just let me know.

Fedora based SteamOS

Screenshot from 2014-06-09 16:39:27I’ve added the packages that make up Valve’s SteamOS customizations to the Steam package repository for Fedora. Although mostly working, some issues cannot be solved due to SteamOS being based on Debian and the main Steam client being binary only and calling specific Debian commands like dpkg.

At the current status, I will not post the packages for review on RPMFusion but will keep them hosted only here until they work a
bit better. For now, just use the packages if you want to tinker with them or help with the porting.

Parts related to PolicyKit are a bit raw, I need to convert the rules to systemd’s logind rules as this is what is used now in Fedora.

Valve improved X-Box gamepad driver for Fedora

steamos-gaming2

I’ve added to the Steam package repository for Fedora an alternative kernel module for xpad, the X-Box gamepad driver. This variant contains patches created by Valve to improve the driver and its behaviour.

The module is available in both akmod (RPMFusion) and dkms package formats.

This made my 3rd party X-Box controller work without any issue in Steam games and in the Big Picture Mode interface!

I’ve added a note on Valve’s wiki and Steam forums regarding it, for installation and instructions just head to to the Steam repository page.